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Elixir Cross Referencer

Every project has its own recursive patterns, and oFono is not an exception.
This document describes the most common ones found in the code.

Typical flow for atom <-> atom driver operations
================================================
Most of the time, the core atom for a given request calls a function in
the atom driver, which generally executes some commands against the modem,
and can then return the results to the core.

For example:

dbus call: lte/SetProperty(DefaultAPN)
    |
    v
core: check APN validity, call the modem atom for execution in the modem
        |
        v
atom driver: schedules 'AT+CGDCONT=0,"IP","MyNiceAPN"' for execution
            |
[ break in the flow: the functions return back to the core, the dbus request ]
[                       is not answered at this time                         ]
                ...
[GLibMain event loop schedules the command, it is sent to the modem and the  ]
[                       modem's reply is obtained                            ]
            |
            v
atom driver: a callback function, optionally provided when AT command was
scheduled is now called
        |
        v
core: atom driver core callback function is now called. This was passed from
the core as an argument, earlier, when the atom driver operation was invoked,
along with some context data (opaque info for the atom driver containing core
atom owned data)
    |
    v
the core can now answer the dbus message


In the code, it looks like this:

//core call:
static DBusMessage *lte_set_property(DBusConnection *conn,
					DBusMessage *msg, void *data)
{
	struct ofono_lte *lte = data;

	/*
	 * a block of code here processes the msg and fills the
	 * lte->pending_info structure
	 */

	lte->driver->set_default_attach_info(lte, &lte->pending_info,
					lte_set_default_attach_info_cb, lte);

	return NULL;
}
// lte_set_default_attach_info_cb is the core callback function,
// the lte structure is the parameter that it takes

//atom:
static void at_lte_set_default_attach_info(const struct ofono_lte *lte,
			const struct ofono_lte_default_attach_info *info,
			ofono_lte_cb_t cb, void *data)
{
	struct lte_driver_data *ldd = ofono_lte_get_data(lte);

	// next line creates a structure for the in-atom callback
	struct cb_data *cbd = cb_data_new(cb, data);

	if (g_at_chat_send(ldd->chat, "AT", NULL,
					at_lte_set_default_attach_info_cb,
					cbd, g_free) > 0)
		return;

	g_free(cbd);
	CALLBACK_WITH_FAILURE(cb, data);
}
// here the structure is allocate dynamically, and since it is quite common,
// the function g_at_chat_send accepts the last 3 parameters:
// - in-atom callback function
// - in-atom callback data
// - destroy function for dynamically-allocated callback data
// NOTE: if g_at_chat_send fails, it does not free the memory, so it must be
// done after the call.
// Note also the callback to the core directly here if the g_at_chat_send fails.

//atom callback:

static void at_lte_set_default_attach_info_cb(gboolean ok, GAtResult *result,
							gpointer user_data)
{
	struct cb_data *cbd = user_data;

	if (result == NULL) {
		CALLBACK_WITH_FAILURE(cbd->cb, cbd->data);
		return;
	}

	decode_at_error(&error, g_at_result_final_response(result));
	cbd->cb(&error, cbd->data);
}
// note that here cbd must not be released, it will be done by the GAtChat
// after invoking the callback (at_lte_set_default_attach_info_cb)
// note also that the core function will be executed before cbd is released,
// so the last line of the code is ok.


Use of the cb_data in AT command based atom drivers
===================================================

the cb_data can be used by creating the structure with cb_data_new,
and then there are two possibilities:
- use it in a single callback function, and destroy it with a call to
  g_free.
  Example:
  - calling function:
    struct cb_data *cbd = cb_data_new(cb, data);
    if (g_at_chat_send(chat, buf, NULL, at_cgatt_cb, cbd, g_free) > 0)
	return;
    g_free(cbd);
  - called function (here at_cgatt_cb):
	static void at_cgatt_cb(gboolean ok, GAtResult *result,
						gpointer user_data)
	{
		struct cb_data *cbd = user_data;
		ofono_gprs_cb_t cb = cbd->cb;
		struct ofono_error error;

		decode_at_error(&error,
				g_at_result_final_response(result));

		cb(&error, cbd->data);
	}
    note the absence of explicit g_free(cbd);

- pass it through a train of callback functions, adding a reference at
  each pass cb_data_ref, and removing it with cb_data_unref.
  the use of cb_data_ref would replace a new object creation, while the
  use of cb_data_unref the use of g_free.
  Example:
  - calling function:
	struct cb_data *cbd = cb_data_new(cb, data);
	// no cb_ref at the creation
	if (g_at_chat_send(chat, buf, NULL,
				at_lte_set_default_attach_info_cb,
				cbd, cb_data_unref) > 0)
		goto end;
	cb_data_unref(cbd);
  - called function 1 (at_lte_set_default_attach_info_cb):
	static void at_lte_set_default_attach_info_cb(gboolean ok,
				GAtResult *result, gpointer user_data)
	{
		struct cb_data *cbd = user_data;

		cbd = cb_data_ref(cbd);
		if (g_at_chat_send(chat, buf, NULL,
				at_cgatt_cb, cbd, cb_data_unref) > 0)
			return;
		cb_data_unref(cbd);
	}
  - called function 2 (at_cgatt_cb):
    like above. no call to g_free or cb_data_unref. The terminal function
    doesn't need to know about the reference scheme.